Charitable Gift Types

Grantor Lead Trust

A grantor lead trust is a form of charitable lead trust in which the donor of the trust is considered the owner of the trust's assets for tax purposes. The most common reason for a charitable lead trust being treated as a grantor trust is that the donor of the trust will receive the trust principal when the trust terminates.

ACGA Gift Annuity Rates

The American Council on Gift Annuities – ACGA – is a national organization of charities that promotes charitable gift annuities. One of its functions is that it issues tables of suggested maximum annuity rates that member charities should offer to their donors. The rates vary with age: the older the annuitant or annuitants, the higher the suggested maximum annuity rate.

Generation Skipping Transfer Tax

Generation skipping transfer tax is a federal transfer tax that is assessed on an individual who transfers assets to a "skip person" during life or by will. This tax is assessed in addition to gift or estate tax. Its purpose is to prevent donors from avoiding transfer taxation in one generation by giving assets directly to the next generation.

Flip Unitrust with Makeup Provision

A flip charitable remainder unitrust with a makeup provision ("unitrust”) is a gift plan defined by federal tax law that allows a donor to provide income to herself and/or others while making a generous gift to charity. The income may continue for the lifetimes of the beneficiaries, a fixed term of not more than 20 years, or a combination of the two.

Flip Unitrust

A flip charitable remainder unitrust ("unitrust") is a gift plan defined by federal tax law that allows a donor to provide income to herself and/or others while making a generous gift to charity. The income may continue for the lifetimes of the beneficiaries, a fixed term of not more than 20 years, or a combination of the two.

Flexible Gift Annuity

A flexible gift annuity is a simple contract between the donor and the charity. In exchange for a irrevocable gift of cash, securities, or other assets, the charity agrees to pay one or two annuitants a fixed sum each year for life, with payments starting at least one year after the gift. The annuitants may elect to start receiving payments on any one of a range of dates, such as June 30th of any year from 2005 - 2025. These dates and their corresponding payment amounts must be listed in the agreement. The flexibility to choose when payments start is appealing to annuitants who at the time of the gift are not sure when they will want to start receiving income.

5% Probability Test

The 5% probability test is a test described in Revenue Ruling 77-374 that requires all charitable remainder annuity trusts (CRAT) that will make payments for one or more lifetimes to have less than a 5% chance of corpus exhaustion. The test is conducted using the same facts used to compute the provisional charitable deduction for the gift.